Multiple connections with Hive

We’ve been using Hadoop and Hive at Forward for just over a year now. We have lots of batch jobs written in Ruby (using our Mandy library) and a couple in Clojure (using my fork of cascading-clojure). This post covers a little of how things hang together following a discussion on the Hive mailing list around opening multiple connections to the Hive service.

Hive has some internal thread safety problems (see HIVE-80) that meant we had to do something a little boutique with HAProxy given our usage. This article covers a little about how Hive fits into some of our batch and ad-hoc processing and how we put it under HAProxy.


Hive is used for both programmatic jobs and interactively by analysts. Interactive queries come via a web-based product, called CardWall, that was built for our search agency. In both cases, behind the scenes, we have another application that handles scheduling jobs, retrying when things fail (and alerting if it’s unlikely to work thereafter).

Batch Scheduling

Internally, this is how things (roughly) look:

Batch processing

The Scheduler is responsible for knowing which jobs need to run and queuing work items. Within the batch processing application an Agent will pick up an item and check whether it’s dependencies are available (we use this to integrate with all kinds of other reporting systems, FTP sites etc.). If things aren’t ready it will place the item back on the queue with a delay (we use Beanstalkd which makes this all very easy).

Enter Hive

You’ll notice from the first screenshot we have some Hive jobs that are queued. When we first started using Hive we started using a single instance of the HiveServer service started as follows: $HIVE_HOME/bin/hive --service hiveserver. Mostly this was using a Ruby Gem called RBHive.

This worked fine when we were using it with a single connection, but, we ran into trouble when writing apps that would connect to Hive as part of our batch processing system.

Originally there was no job affinity, workers would pick up any piece of work and attempt it, and with nearly 20 workers this could heavily load the Hive server. Over time we introduced different queues to handle different jobs, allowing us to allocate a chunk of agents to sensitive resources (like Hive connections).

Multiple Hive Servers

We have a couple of machines that run multiple HiveServer instances. We use Upstart to manage these processes (so have hive1.conf, hive2.conf… in our /etc/init directory). Each config file specifies a port to open the service on (10001 in the example below).

These are then load-balanced with HAProxy, the config file we use for that is below